Ahsoka

Star Wars: Ahsoka Book Cover Star Wars: Ahsoka
Star Wars
E.K. Johnston
Sci-fi
Disney Lucasfilm Press
October 11, 2016
Hardcover
400

Fans have long wondered what happened to Ahsoka after she left the Jedi Order near the end of the Clone Wars, and before she re-appeared as the mysterious Rebel operative Fulcrum in Rebels. Finally, her story will begin to be told. Following her experiences with the Jedi and the devastation of Order 66, Ahsoka is unsure she can be part of a larger whole ever again. But her desire to fight the evils of the Empire and protect those who need it will lead her right to Bail Organa, and the Rebel Alliance….

 

Ahsoka is a fairly popular character in the Star Wars Expanded Universe. For those of you who have not watched Star Wars: The Clone Wars (spoilers ahead), here is a quick rundown. Ahsoka began as Anakin Skywalker’s apprentice early into the Clone Wars. Over the course of the war, her skills grew as the warring state of the galaxy gave her fairly unique Jedi training. Towards the end of the war, she was framed for murdering a prisoner. The Jedi more or less knew she did not do it but were going to string her up for political reasons. In the process, she was expelled from the Jedi Order. Anakin manages to prove her innocence at the last moment, but she refuses to return to the Jedi. Betrayed by her family, she struck out on her own and survived the Jedi Purge as a result. That is where the novel Ahsoka picks up.

Before this book came out, Ahsoka has already made her reappearance in the show Star Wars: Rebels. This book fills the gap between her departure in The Clone Wars and her role as a Rebel. The Clone Wars saw Ahsoka go from inexperienced girl to warrior woman. Rebels portrays her as a more experienced veteran in both combat and leadership. Ahsoka herself is portrayed well; she is smart, heroic, and strives to help the people around her. At the same time, she is scared and alone knowing that the Empire will be hunting her. By and large, this book is about her transitioning from refugee on the run to rebel striking back against the Empire.

Beyond Ahsoka’s character development, this book does not really do too much. The other characters seem like one-shots we will never see again. While developing Ahsoka seems like it was the only thing this book was really meant to do, it did make the story feel a bit dull. We have already seen her later in life during Rebels and the episodes of Rebels she pops up in seem to do more for her story than this book. For readers who are interested in Ahsoka’s character, this book is certainly worth the read. But for people who are just concerned with the overall storylines and plot points of Star Wars, Ahsoka does not really do anything. Also, this book will make very little sense if you have not watched The Clone Wars, which is something of a time consumer.

February 12, 2017

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