Honor Among Enemies (Honor Harrington #6)

Honor Among Enemies Book Cover Honor Among Enemies
Honor Harrington
David Weber
Sci-fi
Baen
June 1, 1996
Paperback
544

KNOW THY ENEMY

For Captain Honor Harrington, it's sometimes hard to know who the enemy really is. Despite political foes, professional jealousies, and the scandal which drove her into exile, she's been offered a chance to reclaim her career as an officer of the Royal Manticoran Navy. But there's a catch. She must assume command of a ''squadron'' of jury-rigged armed merchantmen with crew drawn from the dregs of her service and somehow stop the pirates who have taken advantage of the Havenite War to plunder the Star Kingdom's commerce.

That would be hard enough, but some of the ''pirates'' aren't exactly what they seem . . . and neither are some of her ''friends,'' For Honor has been carefully chosen for her mission—by two implacable and powerful enemies.

The way they see it, either she stops the raiders or the raiders kill her . . . and either way, they win.

 

Honor Among Enemies finds our title heroine put into an impossible situation by her political enemies. To fix a problem her enemies are having or die trying. It’s a win-win for them. So long as you completely ignore the fact that it’s Honor. She’s got a pretty good track record of turning things around in her favor. And yet people continue to ignore this because of their own overconfidence and ego. Much to their regret (if they’re still alive afterward to have any).

Now, there is a fair amount of rehashing and world-building in the early part of this book. This might be a turnoff for some people, but I appreciate it. This is a long series; I’m not reading these books back-to-back. Nor would anyone who followed these books back when they were reading them right as they released. Those little reminders are super helpful because maybe it’s been months since I read the last book.

And as far as worldbuilding goes, I love it. Granted, spending so much time on worldbuilding may not be the most efficient method for getting the story going in this specific book. But it’s important to the overall series. I particularly enjoy the political aspect of it all but, again, that’s not for everyone. There’s also a fair amount of time spent on the characters themselves, which you really should expect because you’re reading a space opera.

Aside from all that, Honor Among Enemies is your standard military sci-fi fare. Space battles, tactical decisions, big explosions, and all that good stuff. And Honor just, you know, being Honor. We’re six books in by this point; you should know what to expect. Plus, this is still the early stages of a military series where it focuses on the main character. If it’s like most other military series I’ve read, the scope will widen significantly the longer the series goes on. And I look forward to that too.

August 22, 2021

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