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The Invisible Man

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Poster for the movie "The Invisible Man"

The Invisible Man

What You Can't See Can Hurt You

20202 h 04 min
Overview

When Cecilia's abusive ex takes his own life and leaves her his fortune, she suspects his death was a hoax. As a series of coincidences turn lethal, Cecilia works to prove that she is being hunted by someone nobody can see.

Metadata
Director Leigh Whannell
Runtime 2 h 04 min
Release Date 26 February 2020
Details
Movie Media VoD
Movie Status Available
Movie Rating Very good

I originally dodged this movie for two reasons. #1, from the trailer I thought it looked lame. The first part of the trailer has this whole “is Elisabeth Moss’ character crazy or is there really an Invisible Man?” thing going on. And then it’s just like, “Oh, no, there’s an Invisible Man.” And I took that as the trailer just giving too much away, as trailers tend to do. #2, Vincent Price is one of my all-time favorite actors and I really didn’t expect this movie to outdo his classic Invisible Man film. But I was bored one weekend, and then this popped up, so I watched it anyway. And I’m very glad I did.

This is one of those adaptations that’s mostly in name only. Aside from the titular Invisible Man’s last name being Griffin, this movie has little in common with the original H.G. Wells story. If you’re not familiar with the original story, it’s about a man who makes an invisibility drug and can’t change back. Now, the original movie has madness as a side effect of the formula. The book implies that Griffin was always kind of nuts and being invisible just pushed him over the edge. So, in that way, this remake is more in line with Wells’ book than the original movie was. But the similarities stop there.

Now, the biggest difference is that this story isn’t really about the Invisible Man. In older versions, the Invisible Man was our protagonist. In this film, he’s more of a driving force as we follow Elisabeth Moss’ character Cecilia (“Cee”). The whole invisibility thing isn’t really the catalyst of this story. It’s about Cee trying to get away from her abusive husband. You could remove the “Invisible Man” element and large parts of this story would still work. They’d be harder to pull off, but they could still work in theory.

And it’s really Moss’ performance that sells this film. The Invisible Man aspect puts her in a situation that a lot of people are really unfortunately in: no one believes her. The fantastical elements make her situation a lot more extreme than a real-world scenario, but that core element remains the same. And that element, in no small part due to Moss’ amazing performance, is what makes this film so good.

I went into this movie with pretty low expectations, but it’s a good movie. Not just a good horror movie, mind you, but a good movie. That is extremely difficult to pull off in the horror genre. They really took the basic idea of the Invisible Man and put an incredible modern spin on it. And this movie was made on only a $7 million budget; it looks amazing for that. Good movie in general, great movie if you love horror.

March 28, 2021

Us

Published Post author

Poster for the movie "Us"

Us

Watch yourself

20191 h 56 min
Overview

Husband and wife Gabe and Adelaide Wilson take their kids to their beach house expecting to unplug and unwind with friends. But as night descends, their serenity turns to tension and chaos when some shocking visitors arrive uninvited.

Metadata
Director Jordan Peele
Runtime 1 h 56 min
Release Date 14 March 2019
Details
Movie Media Cinema
Movie Status Available
Movie Rating Very good

Let’s start by saying that Us is an absolutely terrifying horror movie. Easily within the top 10% of all horror movies in terms of scariness. That being said, it is a horror movie. You may be tempted to compare it to Get Out, but this is not a thriller like Peele’s previous film. This is a movie designed to invoke fear and get your heart racing. Is it a masterpiece of cinema? No. Is it a masterpiece of the horror genre? You absolutely bet it is. So, get that out of your system now before diving in.

Even at the beginning of the film when things are ordinary, things feel off. The main characters are not a perfect family and clearly have some issues while trying to keep it all together and enjoy their summer vacation. This is really driven home for the audience by the soundtrack. The music has just the right blend to leave you with a feeling of alien fear, a fear of the unknown as you know something that seems impossible is coming to hurt you. Some scenes are a little goofy, so the entire film is not deranged and dark. These bits provide a healthy sense of balance and moderation; a little light in the darkness.

On the other side of things, this is a movie that requires a sense of disbelief. It also requires viewers to pay close attention. There is a lot of foreshadowing and symbolism throughout the film; some things may be missed during the first viewing. It skims the realm of contemporary horror (Hereditary, The Witch, or It Follows), but just barely. While those types of films are beloved by critics and die-hard horror fans, they do not go over well with general audiences. Peele touched them just enough to be interesting but not turn most people off.

If you try to go too deep, Us is not a story that really holds up to critical analysis. There are a number of holes that require that sense of disbelief. If you think closely some can be explained while others cannot. But conceptually, that decision on Peele’s part really comes down to interpretation. If you like to have things explained and know everything about a story in detail, you may be disappointed. But if things do not quite make sense, if these horrible things that are happening seem illogical and inconceivable, that can make the fact that they are happening all the more terrifying.

March 31, 2019